The Woolworth Building
History

Guerrero Yee LLP is headquartered in the national landmark Woolworth Building in Manhattan, New York. Completed in 1913, the Woolworth Building stands at a height of 792 feet, 1 inch. Conceived by Frank W. Woolworth, designed by Cass Gilbert and engineered by Gunvald Aus, it was designed and built to be the tallest building in the world.

The architect, Cass Gilbert, designed The Woolworth Building with a definite Gothic style. The building’s heavy steel frame is well hidden by its Gothic-style and heavily detailed terra cotta shell. The lobby/arcade has a cruciform floor plan, vaulted ceilings and Gothic-style ornamentation. The lobby ceiling is laid with colored glass in Byzantine/Early Christian mosaic style. The marble and bronze around the mailboxes, elevators and doors are in gothic design. The lobby halls include a set of humorous gargoyles depicting the key people in the building’s construction. There are murals on either end of the lobby’s north-south hallway at the mezzanine level, depicting Labor and Commerce, respectively. The building has arched entryways, also ornamented beautifully.

On April 24th, 1913, President Woodrow Wilson pressed a button in Washington, D. C. that first illuminated the more than 5,000 windows in The Woolworth Building. A triumph of American building technology and architectural prowess, it reigned as the world’s tallest building until 1930. Known as “the Cathedral of Commerce,” the Woolworth Building was clad in gleaming architectural terra-cotta. Located on one of busiest sites in the city, The Woolworth Building is an international symbol of New York City and America’s “can do” spirit. It is truly a masterpiece in all respects.

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